UC Observer logo
UCObserver on SoundCloud UCObserver on YouTube UCObserver on Facebook UCObserver on Twitter UCObserver's RSS Feeds

Canadian Dimension

Advocacy magazine reports on the issues too often overlooked by the mainstream

By Vidya Kauri

Canadian Dimension
Edited by Cy Gonick
(Dimension Publications Inc.) $6.95

Canadian Dimension is unapologetically leftist. The opinions expressed in the magazine are passionate and educated. The articles will inspire even the most disenchanted activist to take to the streets, make some noise and continue the struggle for social and environmental justice. Published six times per year, it offers sound solutions to systemic problems and examines how these solutions can be achieved.

Founded in 1963, Canadian Dimension is run by a democratic decision-making collective and draws from a wide range of writers from Canada and around the world. Many are well-known authors and academics, a few are journalists and almost all are actively engaged in social justice.
“From day one to now, we have not been the magazine of observers. We are the magazine of activists looking for social change,” explains editor and publisher Cy Gonick.

At times, the highly opinionated writing can come across as aggressive and dogmatic. Complicated issues and alternative perspectives are presented as though they should be obvious to the reader, and they are not always backed by fact-based analysis. This can be off-putting, especially to the reader who is not 100 percent familiar with all sides of a debate. It leaves a feeling of being told what to think instead of being allowed to form one’s own opinions.

It’s not all serious business with Canadian Dimension. The poetry section provides much-needed relief from the heavy (and often depressing) accounts of corporate, neoliberal malfeasance. The reviews section provides sophisticated critiques of left-wing books.

The best part of Canadian Dimension has to be the regular department called “Cross-Canada Action for Progressive Social Change.” It provides snapshots of activist movements across Canada, explaining why they are taking place and how to get involved.

Reporting on the issues too often overlooked in mainstream publications, Canadian Dimension is true to its slogan: “For people who want to change the world.”

Vidya Kauri is a journalism student at Ryerson University in Toronto.


Readers’ advisory: The discussion below is moderated by The UC Observer and facilitated by Intense Debate (ID), an online commentary system. The Observer reserves the right to edit or reject any comment it deems to be inappropriate. Approved comments may be further edited for length, clarity and accuracy, and published in the print edition of the magazine. Please note: readers do not need to sign up with ID to post their comments on ucobserver.org. We require only your user name and e-mail address. Your comments will be posted from Monday to Friday between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Join the discussion today!
Promotional Image

Editorials

David Wilson%

Observations

by David Wilson

A perfect send-off

Promotional Image

Video

ObserverDocs: My Year of Living Spiritually

by Observer Staff

Anne Bokma left the Dutch Reformed Church as a young adult and eventually became a member of the United Church and then the Unitarian Universalists. Having long explored the "spiritual but not religious" demographic as a writer, she decided to immerse herself in practices — like hiring a soul coach, secular choir-singing and forest bathing — for 12 months to find both enlightenment and entertainment.

Promotional Image

Society

November 2017

Trump country

by David Macfarlane

A northern Alabama county voted almost unanimously for Donald Trump in 2016. One year later, the writer, together with photographer Nigel Dickson, travels there to try to understand why.

Faith

November 2017

Involuntary pilgrim

by David Giuliano

The return of a tumour sets David Giuliano on a path he calls his ‘Camino de Cancer’

Faith

October 2017

A tale of two cancers

by Catherine Gordon

One year after the writer discovered she had breast cancer, her sister in California received the same diagnosis. They both recovered, but their experiences were worlds apart.

Society

November 2017

Trump country

by David Macfarlane

A northern Alabama county voted almost unanimously for Donald Trump in 2016. One year later, the writer, together with photographer Nigel Dickson, travels there to try to understand why.

Faith

November 2017

Involuntary pilgrim

by David Giuliano

The return of a tumour sets David Giuliano on a path he calls his ‘Camino de Cancer’

Faith

November 2017

Grey matter

by Trisha Elliott

Is consciousness just a function of the brain — or something more?

Promotional Image