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WATCH LIST: September 2013

By Observer Staff


Rooted in Peace
Directed by Greg Reitman (Blue Water Entertainment)


American filmmaker Greg Reitman examines the cycle of global violence through his personal experiences with the Gulf War, 9/11 and the aftermath of Hiroshima. Showcasing interviews with Deepak Chopra, the Dalai Lama, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and others, the documentary inspires viewers to question the reasons for war and begin thinking about the changes needed for peace. Sept. 5

The Orenda
By Joseph Boyden (Hamish Hamilton)


The award-winning author of Through Black Spruce and Three Day Road returns with his first novel in five years. Set in the 1630s, The Orenda begins with a massacre and the kidnapping of a gifted Iroquois child by an elder of the Huron Nation. Boyden explores the complicated relationship between these two characters and a Jesuit missionary in their midst, bringing another chapter of Canadian history alive for readers. Sept. 10

Living Ecological Justice: A Biblical Response to the Environmental Crisis
Edited by Mishka Lysack and Karri Munn-Venn (Citizens for Public Justice)


Featuring writers from seven different Christian denominations, including United Church contributors Joy Kennedy and Shaun Loney, this new resource from the Canadian ecumenical group Citizens for Public Justice offers a faith-based approach to ecological issues. Modelled after Living Justice: A Gospel Response to Poverty, the book blends scripture, prayers and reflections with practical activities for groups and individuals. Sept. 15

The Right to Be Cold
By Sheila Watt-Cloutier (Allen Lane)


Drawing on her own life story, Sheila Watt-Cloutier connects climate change to human rights, particularly in the Arctic, where the effects of global warming have already started to destroy traditional ways of life. Raised in Kuujjuaq, Quebec, Watt-Cloutier is an internationally recognized Inuit leader. She was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for her advocacy on the human cost of climate change. Sept. 24


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Video

ObserverDocs: My Year of Living Spiritually

by Observer Staff

Anne Bokma left the Dutch Reformed Church as a young adult and eventually became a member of the United Church and then the Unitarian Universalists. Having long explored the "spiritual but not religious" demographic as a writer, she decided to immerse herself in practices — like hiring a soul coach, secular choir-singing and forest bathing — for 12 months to find both enlightenment and entertainment.

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Faith

January 2018

In the beginning

by Alanna Mitchell

The award-winning science writer travels to northern Australia to explore the world's oldest creation story

Society

January 2018

The good death

by Pieta Woolley

Anglican professor Donald Grayston made dying in peace a lifetime project. His example is inspiring others to plan a meaningful exit.

Faith

January 2018

Me, Dad and the Almighty

by Anne Bayin

A preacher’s kid pretended to be a devout daughter, but secretly she felt lost in a wilderness of doubt.

Society

January 2018

The good death

by Pieta Woolley

Anglican professor Donald Grayston made dying in peace a lifetime project. His example is inspiring others to plan a meaningful exit.

Faith

January 2018

In the beginning

by Alanna Mitchell

The award-winning science writer travels to northern Australia to explore the world's oldest creation story

Faith

January 2018

Me, Dad and the Almighty

by Anne Bayin

A preacher’s kid pretended to be a devout daughter, but secretly she felt lost in a wilderness of doubt.

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