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Nobel Peace Prize recipient Malala Yousafzai in a still from the new documentary, 'He Named Me Malala.' Photo by ©2015 Fox Searchlight

WATCH LIST: OCTOBER 2015

By Observer Staff


He Named Me Malala
DIRECTED BY DAVIS GUGGENHEIM, FEATURING MALALA YOUSAFZAI AND ZIAUDDIN

YOUSAFZAI
(Parkes-MacDonald/Little Room)

In 2012, she was shot for suggesting girls should have an education. Two years later, she became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Now, a documentary by Davis Guggenheim (director of An Inconvenient Truth) offers an intimate glimpse into the life of Malala Yousafzai, showing her as both a courageous activist and a typical Pakistani teen. Oct. 2

Preaching the Big Questions: Doctrine Isn’t Dusty
BY CATHERINE FAITH MACLEAN AND JOHN H. YOUNG
(United Church Publishing House)

Think theology is boring? Think again, argue authors Rev. Catherine Faith MacLean and Rev. John H. Young. In Preaching the Big Questions, they explore the mysteries of church tradition — or, as they describe it, the “why of our faith” — and how spiritual teachings can be applied in everyday life. Available through UCRDstore.ca. Oct. 1

Generational IQ: Christianity Isn’t Dying, Millennials Aren’t the Problem, And the Future Is Bright
BY HAYDN SHAW
(Tyndale House Publishers)


Amid concerns of shrinking congregations and the death of the church as we know it, Haydn Shaw says there’s no need to worry. His latest release explores how we can change our views of Christianity as the church undergoes a seismic generational shift — and why fresh approaches to faith can lead to a brighter future. Oct. 1

Snapshots of a Girl
BY BELDAN SEZEN
(Arsenal Pulp Press)


For Beldan Sezen, coming out as a lesbian was an international affair. In her second graphic novel, Snapshots of a Girl, the illustrator recounts grappling with her sexual identity while living in both Islamic and Christian societies in the United States, Turkey and western Europe. First released in Italian, the book offers a candid and humorous look at the intersection of religious culture and sexuality. Oct. 13


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