UC Observer logo
UCObserver on SoundCloud UCObserver on YouTube UCObserver on Facebook UCObserver on Twitter UCObserver's RSS Feeds

Simply in Season

Food writers celebrate the simple pleasures of eating locally

By Samantha Rideout

Simply in Season
By Mary Beth Lind and
Cathleen Hockman-Wert
(Herald Press) $26.10

At the Jean-Talon farmers market in Montreal, vendors sell fresh produce in intimidating heaps. I’ve often visited and felt slightly overwhelmed: what could I possibly do with so many corncobs or so much zucchini? But recently I went armed with the cookbook Simply in Season, so the corn teamed up with cilantro, red pepper and some tomatoes for a tart salad. The leftovers went into a plum tomato pie. It all tasted so fresh that I leaned back after eating and thought, “I forgot that food could be so good.”

Simply in Season contains a lot of tasty ways to cook up local produce; however, it is first and foremost a book about ethical eating. “We have become distant from our food, and not just in terms of geography,” the introduction says. “Who grows our food? What are their lives like? How is the soil cultivated and prepared for the next year? How are the animals treated? Each food purchase we make is like a vote for the way we want food to be produced — and for the world in which we want to live.”

Simply in Season also argues that eating locally is a spiritual experience. The authors celebrate simple pleasures like pulling vegetables out of a garden or strengthening one’s body with healthy food.

Of course, the same food isn’t grown everywhere, and Simply in Season leaves out a lot of local delicacies like Saskatoon berries or Maritime fiddleheads. Luckily, many of the recipes are flexible enough to leave room for cooks to add in whatever goodies are heaping up at their local farmers market.

Readers’ advisory: The discussion below is moderated by The UC Observer and facilitated by Intense Debate (ID), an online commentary system. The Observer reserves the right to edit or reject any comment it deems to be inappropriate. Approved comments may be further edited for length, clarity and accuracy, and published in the print edition of the magazine. Please note: readers do not need to sign up with ID to post their comments on ucobserver.org. We require only your user name and e-mail address. Your comments will be posted from Monday to Friday between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Join the discussion today!

Environment

Song leader, police and gate blockers in front of the Kinder Morgan gates. Photo by Kimiko Karpoff

A Kinder Morgan protest in photos and song

by Kimiko Karpoff

A faith leader reflects on protesting the pipeline with the Water Protectors from the Tsleil-Waututh nation.

Promotional Image

Editorials

The United Church Observer's editor and publisher, Jocelyn Bell. Photo: Lindsay Palmer

Observations: #MeToo

by Jocelyn Bell

Our hope is that by giving voice to these #MeToo stories, a new conversation about sexual misconduct can begin.

Promotional Image

Video

ObserverDocs: Playing by Heart

by Observer Staff

United Church music director Kara Shaw was born prematurely, became almost totally blind and was later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Today, the 28-year-old showcases her unique musical ability, performing piano on local and national stages.

Promotional Image

Society

June 2018

Why some women of colour are hesitant to say #MeToo

by Jacky Habib

Three women share their stories in the hope of creating safe spaces they never had.

Environment

May 2018

A Kinder Morgan protest in photos and song

by Kimiko Karpoff

On April 28, 2018, faith leaders from many traditions, including the United Church, stood in solidarity with Water Protectors from the Tsleil-Waututh nation to protest the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion in Burnaby, B.C.. Kimiko Karpoff captured the day in pictures.

Faith

June 2018

After 93 years, this will be the United Church's last General Council meeting

by Mike Milne

When the United Church meets in July, top priorities will be a streamlined governance structure and Indigenous ministries.

Justice

June 2018

#MeToo in the United Church

by Trisha Elliott

9 women share their stories of harassment and sexual assault in the United Church.

Columns

May 2018

On grief and the healing power of gardening

by Paul Fraumeni

A writer reflects on how growing tomatoes is helping him find peace while dealing with the loss of loved ones, including his son.

Editorials

June 2018

Observations: #MeToo

by Jocelyn Bell

Our hope is that by giving voice to these #MeToo stories, a new conversation about sexual misconduct can begin.

Promotional Image