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WATCH LIST: July/August 2017

By Observer Staff


An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power
DIRECTED BY BONNI COHEN AND JON SHENK, FEATURING AL GORE
(Actual Films/Participant Media)


In this sequel to the 2006 documentary An Inconvenient Truth, environmentalist and former U.S. vice-president Al Gore renews his call for concrete and immediate action on climate change. He contends that climate change naysayers, including U.S. President Donald Trump, have stalled humanity’s progress and jeopardized the renewable energy revolution. July 28

The Canadian History Hall
CANADIAN MUSEUM OF HISTORY
(Gatineau, Que.)


In celebration of Canada’s 150th anniversary, this exhibition at the Canadian Museum of History explores the diverse people and perspectives that have shaped our nation’s collective history. The Canadian History Hall highlights what makes Canada unique, from the country’s earliest inhabitants — brought back through scientific reconstruction — to the struggles and triumphs that led to Confederation, to the social and political rights underlying our inclusive society. July 1

Refuge: A Novel
BY DINA NAYERI
(Riverhead Books)


An Iranian girl escapes to America, leaving her father behind. After immersing herself in a western way of life, she moves again, this time to Europe, as refugees from around the world are flowing into the continent. Transformed by her experiences, she realizes, after infrequent visits with her father, how different their lives have become. In this exploration of migration and family, Tehran-born author Dina Nayeri ponders whether home is found in a place or in a person. July 11

Adopted: The Sacrament of Belonging in a Fractured World
BY KELLEY NIKONDEHA
(WM. B. Eerdmans)


Drawing on her experiences as an adopted child and adoptive mother, Kelley Nikondeha, a self-described “practical theologian,” delves into the Christian meaning of adoption. She offers a biblically inspired interpretation of the concept — Jesus as God’s son and humanity as God’s adopted children — broadening our sense of what it means to belong. Aug. 17



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Columns

Moderator nominee Colin Phillips gives his nomination speech at General Council. (Credit: Richard Choe)

Hey, United Church — we could have talked about my disability

by Colin Phillips

A moderator nominee says the majority of commissioners at General Council weren't comfortable enough to truly engage him.

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Observations

Editor/Publisher of The Observer, Jocelyn Bell.

Observations: The rewards of letting go

by Jocelyn Bell

Editor Jocelyn Bell reflects on the upcoming changes for The United Church of Canada, the magazine and in her own life.

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Video

ObserverDocs: Two nurses tackle Vancouver's opioid crisis

Richard Moore is a resident of Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. In this poignant interview, he explains the important work of nurses Evanna Brennan and Susan Giles.

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Columns

August 2018

Why Canada’s first-ever minister for seniors is long overdue

by Julie Lalonde

A gerontologist says she hopes that a ministry dedicated to elder issues will mean that seniors finally have a voice in policy making.

Columns

August 2018

Hey, United Church — we could have talked about my disability

by Colin Phillips

A moderator nominee says the majority of commissioners at General Council weren't comfortable enough to truly engage him.

Interviews

August 2018

'Photography was the way that I could share different Indigenous realities'

by Emma Prestwich

Award-winning photographer Nadya Kwandibens wants to change the perception of Indigenous people through her work.

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