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Quotes from Gretta Vosper’s written submission

By Elena Gritzan


Gretta Vosper and her legal team prepared a 176-page submission in advance of her review in June. It goes through her time in Sunday school, theological college and as a minster to explain what she believes and why. Here are some highlights:

Her view of God:
“God, a supreme, omnipresent, omniscient, benevolent, omnipowerful being who resides in and rules both the supernatural and natural realms and who has the ability to intervene in the latter, the theistic concept of God, did not survive my theological education…. I came to know god as something I could acknowledge or deny, as love I could show or withhold, and by doing so, either limit or enhance its presence in my life.”

On Jesus: “I was inspired through my study [of Jesus] to be open to new ways to live, exemplify, and tell that story through my own life, in my personal choices, in my relationships, and in the living of what would eventually be my legacy. I remain committed to that approach, to finding new ways, relevant for the contemporary community I serve, to relate that story in a way that is inspiring to them. Even if it means letting go of the story that initially inspired me.”

On her call to ministry: “What call was not for me, was a communication or sign from a divine interventionist deity directing me to the path chosen for me and for which that deity had outfitted me. There were students at the College who reported extraordinary experiences….I did not have an experience at all like that; my call emerged as a deep conviction that I was to use my gifts in a particular area.”

On making her beliefs public: “Though I would be speaking of God in a non-theistic sense, many heard me talking of a personal all-loving, all-wise God who intervened in human lives. It is not that I decided I wanted to disabuse them of that view, much less evangelize other churches towards non-theism. I simply wanted to be clear about what I meant, about the concept that I hold myself accountable for.”

On West Hill United: “West Hill is a congregation that has continually engaged in open dialogue….Of great importance has been to keep in close touch with the wider culture in which we all live, and identify what about the way we communicate might act as barriers to participation to those outside the church. Each time barriers have been identified, West Hill has worked hard to eliminate them.”




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