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The Milky Way Galaxy. Courtesy of Creative Commons

Our time is now

Lighting the way for Mother Earth

By Carolyn Pogue

Was it because of the November full moon, or because we were entering the dark season? I don’t know, but at the Earth Celebration on Sunday, the image of light kept coming up. The celebration was partly to launch my last book, Rock of Ages.

Cheryle Chagnon Greyeyes and Chantal Stormsong Chagnon began the afternoon with powerful drum songs and prayer. Originally from Muskeg Lake First Nation, Saskatchewan, Cheryle is an administrator at the University of Calgary's Native Centre,  and Chantal runs an eclectic arts company called Cree-8. Together, they bring light and healing to their adopted cit,y and are much in demand to perform and teach.

Sharon Montgomery served as emcee. Through her book, Your Invisible Bodies, her participation in Raging Grannies, Healing Touch ministry and Tai Chi practice, Sharon offers healing on many levels. She has the amazing ability to see auras; she herself casts a warm glow.

Paul Armstrong read On the Pulse of Morning by Maya Angelou and sang music popular in the 1960s. He is an activist and self-described curmudgeon whom we met first at the Lubicon Cree blockade in 1988. Paul enjoys poking pompousness with a sharp stick.

Bill Phipps, my husband, Earth Urbanist and former United Church moderator, embraced the role of Elder. He did that in a presentation, speaking passionately about Earth care and reminding us that coming generations will depend on our right actions. In his so-called retirement, he continues to let the light in through the cracks as stupidity and meanness leak into environmental decisions in Canada. He considers climate change to be a spiritual question.

When I was writing Rock of Ages, which begins with the oldest rock on Earth, I needed to learn more about geology. That brought me to my knees. I certainly did not become an expert, but I did become ever more tender toward Mother Earth. The story inside the rock led me also to explore cosmology, geography, spirituality and ecology.

Reflecting on our Earth Mother, I wondered if my extreme tender feeling was akin to reflecting on my mom’s life after I became an adult. When we age, we look with new eyes at the life that our mother lived. We see what her childhood was like, how she matured, what work she chose, what hurdles she faced because of her family origin, her sex and her economic situation.

Imagining Mother Earth over the eons had been illuminating, and humbling. I visualized her labouring to give birth to all that is. Having laboured and given birth myself, I felt a womanly connection to her as never before.  That was when I decided I needed to sit with an Elder. I took a piece of the raw rock to Doreen Spence. She generously granted an interview, and came to the launch party to speak. What I remember most from her words was about light. She described our time as wildly chaotic, environmentally and economically. And then she said that this is the time when the healers and change-makers will fill with light to do their work.

I looked around the room. Light-filled beings, every one. I need more parties like this.

Author's photo
Carolyn Pogue is a longtime Observer contributor. New posts of The Pogue Blog will appear on the first and third Thursday of the month. For more information on Carolyn Pogue, visit www.carolynpogue.ca..
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